Robin Leblanc

All about Me:

 

I am 34 years old. This is my fifth year teaching at Thickwood Heights and my 10th year of teaching. I have taught in a variety of different settings including: kindergarten, grade 1,2,3 as well as high school and college. I have also done a considerable amount of work in  special needs areas including students with learning disabilities.  

I am looking forward to spending another year in grade 3!

 

General Health Student Expectations:

 

WELLNESS CHOICES

Students will make responsible and informed choices to maintain health and to promote safety for self and others.

 

RELATIONSHIP CHOICES

Students will develop effective interpersonal skills that demonstrate responsibility, respect and caring in order to establish and maintain healthy interactions.

 

LIFE LEARNING CHOICES

Students will use resources effectively to manage and explore life roles and career opportunities

and challenges.

 

Health Game Link

http://www.uen.org/3-6interactives/health.shtml

 

Language Arts Student Expectations:

General Outcome 1

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to explore thoughts, ideas, feelings and experiences.

 

General Outcome 2

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to comprehend and respond personally and critically

to oral, print and other media texts.

 

General Outcome 3

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to manage ideas and information.

 

General Outcome 4

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to enhance the clarity and artistry of communication.

 

General Outcome 5

Students will listen, speak, read, write, view and represent to respect, support and collaborate with others.

 

 

Helpful Links for Language Arts:

If you are looking for homework practice... look no further! 

 

Spelling and Grammar 

  1. Spelling Match Choose a grade level and then match up items in this underwater spelling game. 
  2. Interactive Spelling Bee Grade 3 This set of activities is like an old-fashioned Spelling Bee. 
  3. SpellaRoo Click on the word that is spelled wrong. Most kids will be in the “Beginner” category.
  4. Spell Check Select the word that is spelled incorrectly and write the correct spelling. 
  5. East Lansing Schools' Spelling Program 
  6. Plural Fishing- Go fishing with gnomes to practice your plural spelling rules. (BBC). 

Punctuation

  1. Punctuation Practice 
  2. Proofreading Makes Perfect – Online game for Capitalization and punctuation.
  3. Power Proofreading 
  4. Alphabet Soup – Spelling game with jokes
  5. Little Explorers Picture Dictionary 
  6. Multimedia Grammar Glossary
  7. Language Arts Review 1 (25 multiple choice questions) Punctuation test. 
  8. Language Arts Review 2 (25 multiple choice questions) Punctuation test.
  9. Language Arts Review 3 (25 multiple choice questions) Punctuation test. 
  10. Language Arts Review 4 (25 multiple choice questions) Punctuation test. 
  11. The Internet Picture Dictionary
  12. Internet4 Classrooms -Third Grade Skills (grammar, phonics, reading)

    

Grammar

  1. The Children's Univeristy of Manchester Games to help learn parts of speech, idioms and more. Game on idioms. 
  2. Grammar Gorillas Game on nouns and verbs
  3. Primary Games- language arts
  4. Word Classes: Nouns - Learn all about different kinds of noun. There are lots of "drag and drop" activities in the six sections of this interactive
  5. Noun Explorer  - fun noun game with fish
  6. Verb Power 
  7. Verbs in Space fun verb game
  8. Adjective Adventure Fun game

 

 Synonyms and Antonyms

  1. Squanky the Tooth Taker Tooth Tally – Synonyms
  2. Synoym Sam Fun game
  3. Squanky the Tooth Taker Quiet Quest for Opposites - Antonyms

 

Reading 

  1. STARFALL - I'm Reading!
  2. Stories for the Classroom A collection of interactive stories suitable for K-6 students. Most of the stories are animated and they are organized by reading level.
  3. Practice reading/comprehension: Read a short story then answer questions.
  4. I Can Read Beginning reading. Listen and read each sentence. Then answer questions about the words in the sentence
  5. Into the Book is a reading comprehension resource for K-4 students and teachers.
  6. Aesop Fables Vol. 1 Aesop Fables Vol. 2(Audio/Read along books)
  7. The Paper Bag Princess - Hear and read the online story of the Paper Bag Princess, by Robert Munsch.
  8. Bookflix- Nearly 200 picture books available free on the Online Reference Centre site from LearnAlberta.ca.  Use this resource to access interactive fiction and non-fiction books organized according to themes.
  9. Tumblebooks The Beaumont Library provides a link to Tumblebooks. Look for the link on the right side of the Home page.Online Story books to read  Online Stories for Kids
  10. National Geographic - Pick the issue of National Geographic online magazine you want to listen and read along with. Then click on the LISTEN and READ button below it. A classroom magazine for kindergarten and First Grade.
  11. Speakaboos is a collection of online children's stories, read aloud with illustrations and with the words on each page for you to read-along. Included are favourites, fairy tales, nursery rhymes, fables, folk tales and songs. 
  12. Literactive- The program is comprised of carefully levelled guided readers, comprehensive phonic activities and a wealth of supplemental reading material which gradually develop a child's reading skills in a sequential and enjoyable manner. All the material is available for free from this site but you need to register
  13. TeachingBooks.net is an easy-to-use website that adds a multimedia dimension to the reading experiences of children's and young adult books. The online database is developed and maintained to include thousands of resources about fiction and nonfiction books used in the K–12 environment.
  14. Books to Read Online  A Large collection of links to Interactive Online stories.
  15. Storyline Online: Streaming video program featuring SAG members reading children's books
  16. Aesop's Fables Online Reading Flash-software-based e-texts of popular fables by Aesop. 
  17. Story Bear's Stories (Little Animals Activity Center) Listen to the story and follow directions
  18. Destination Impossible' - read the instructions to help your character get around Skills wise City.
  19. Quia Sequencing Activities - place events in order
  20. Google Lit Trips Combine the satellite imagery of Google Earth with a literature study of a fiction book. 
  21. RazKids (Online leveled Reading Library- Subscription)
  22. Childtopia (Listening and Reading Comprehension)

Vocabulary

Learning Vocabulary Can be Fun!

 

Writing Resources:

Kidblog - Login to your Kidblog account

 

Writing Activities

  1.  Pinky Dinky Doo: The Great Big Story Box - Select one of five stories. You get to build the beginning, the middle and the end of the story, and hear it read aloud as you go.
  2. My Story Maker  Let's you control characters and objects - and creates sentences for you.
  3. Picture Book Maker create your very own picture book
  4. Tell a Story You can tell thousands of different stories by choosing one of the Tell-a-Story Challenges and letting your imagination go wild. (Kidspace)
  5. Story Jumper A Place to create and discover stories.
  6. Stop and Go Stories. Choose a picture and help the characters write a story!
  7. Storybird - Art Inspired Collaborative Story Telling! Storybird reverses the process of visual storytelling by starting with the image and "unlocking" the story inside. Choose an artist or a theme, get inspired, and start writing!  Teachers Set up a class Account
  8. Scholastic Story Starters A creative activity that can be different every time you try it. Select your grade and then spin the wheels to see what your story will be about. Then, choose a format for the story.
  9. Fairy Tales 
  10. Story Plant  Grow your own story from the story plant. Sky will guide you through the steps in planning and writing a story. At each step, choose a leaf and click on it. When the plant has stopped growing, listen to Sky read the story you've made. Then print it out and finish it off or grow another story.
  11. Instructions: pick a task then select the correct instructions on how to do it.
  12. Writing Instructions  this website explores the features of written instructions. It looks at the use of time words to show the order and of verbs. Super illustrations.
  13. Write a POSTCARD and send it online!
  14. Send an Arthur E-card
  15. Letter Generator interactive help for writing friendly letters.
  16. Story Starters!  What makes for an awesome story starter?  Work with a team to rank the best and worst ways to start a story. Look at stars and stinkers, and figure out what makes the best ones work!

 

Writing Projects

  1. Tell Us Your Story (a digital story project using PhotoStory)
  2. Grade Three Fractured Fairy Tale Project
  3. Monster Swap create monsters no one has ever seen before1 After drawing your  monsters,  write descriptive paragraphs about your creations and share!
  4. Create a Talking Book! using MS PowerPoint. 
  5. Grade Three Fairy Tales Project Compare and Contrast.
  6. Comparing and Contrasting Fairy Tales
  7. Cinderella, Cinderella, Cinderella Read and analyze a variety of Cinderella stories. Use synonyms to revise the traditional Cinderella story. Study the characters through poetry. Evaluate the characters.
  8. Amazing Animals- Animal Report WebQuest
  9. Oceanography ABC Books (write and illustrate an ABC book)
  10. The True Story of the Three Little Pigs (Scholastic) Write from a different point of view.
  11. Fables! Fables! Fables! 
  12. In Search of Stellaluna's Family (Learn about bats and write a letter to Stellaluna).
  13.  Shocking Sharks Compare animals and write a shark commercial or adventure story.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Animal Life cycles

Students Expectations for Animal Lifecycles:

1. Classify a variety of animals, based on observable characteristics; e.g., limbs, teeth, body covering, overall shape, backbone.

2. Observe and describe the growth and development of at least one living animal, as the animal develops from early to more advanced stages. The animal(s) should be from one or more of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects. Suggested examples include: gerbils, guppies, mealworms, tadpoles, worms, butterflies/moths. Additional examples from other animal groups might also be included: brine shrimp, isopods, spiders.

3. Predict the next stages in the growth and development of at least one animal from each of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects; and identify similarities and differences in their developmental sequences.

4. Identify the food needs of at least one animal from each of the following groups: mammals, birds, fish, reptiles, amphibians, insects; and describe changes in how each animal obtains food through different stages of its life.

5. Demonstrate awareness that parental care is characteristic of some animals and not of others, and identify examples of different forms of parental care.

6. Demonstrate awareness that animals require different habitats in order to meet their basic needs of food, water, shelter and space.

7. Recognize adaptations of a young animal to its environment, and identify changes in its relationship to its environment as it goes through life; e.g., tadpoles are adapted for life in an aquatic environment; adult frogs show adaptations to both terrestrial and aquatic environments.

8. Identify examples of environmental conditions that may threaten animal survival, and identify examples of extinct animals.

9. Recognize that habitat preservation can help maintain animal populations, and identify ways that student actions can assist habitat preservation.

10. Demonstrate knowledge of the needs of animals studied, and demonstrate skills for their care.

Animal Life Cycle Supplemental Materials

Bill Nye Locomotion:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W7Ta1gY3QXE

Protection videos:

Vertebrates vs Invertebrate:

Predator and prey:

Habitat:

Lifecycle:

Food Chain:

Interactive Old Pellet Disection:

Amphibians:

Amphibians National Geographic:

National Geographic Birds:

National Geographic Mammals:

Read more on National Geographic.Press the listen and read button to get the current publication and press the more issues section to get other publications: http://ngexplorer.cengage.com/ngyoungexplorer/index.html

Locomotion:

Adaptation:

Adaptation Game:

Reptiles:

Fun Activity:

 

 

Rocks and Minerals

1. Compare samples of various kinds of rock, and identify similarities and differences.

2. Given a description of the properties of a particular rock or mineral, identify a sample rock or mineral that matches those properties. Properties that students should be able to describe and interpret include:

  • colour
  • lustre or “shininess”; e.g., shiny, dull, glassy, metallic, earthy
  • texture; e.g., rough, smooth, uneven
  • hardness, based on scratch tests with available materials
  • presence of carbonates. Note that the presence of carbonates can be tested with vinegar or another mild acid
  • crystal shape for minerals, or overall
  • pattern of rocks.

3. Describe and classify a group of rocks and minerals, based upon the above properties.

4. Recognize that rocks are composed of a variety of materials; and given a coursegrained rock and magnifier, describe some of the component materials.

5. Recognize and describe the various components within a sample of soil; e.g., clay, sand, pebbles, decaying plants; and describe differences between two different soil samples.

6. Describe ways in which rocks break down to become soil, and demonstrate one or more of these ways; e.g., by shaking a group of small, soft rocks in a jar of water; by striking rocks together.

Note: Safety goggles should be used.

7. Describe some common uses of rocks and minerals; and identify examples of those uses within the school, home or local community.

Rocks and Minerals Supplemental Materials

Overview:

Students explore the nature of sound, its sources, its qualities and what it is. They learn that sound is vibration and that changes in vibration can affect the loudness, pitch and quality of sound. They learn about sound travel by studying what things carry sound, what things make it louder or softer, and what happens to sound when it reaches their ears. The sensitivity of human ears and those of other animals is examined, as students learn about the safe use of this valuable sense. General Learner Expectations Students will: 3–9 Describe the nature of sound, and demonstrate methods for producing and controlling sound.

 

Specific Learner Expectations Students will: 

 

1. Identify examples of vibration. 

2. Recognize that sound is the result of vibration; and demonstrate that the larger the vibration, the louder the sound. 

3. Recognize that there are ways of measuring the loudness of sounds and that loud sounds pose a danger to the ear.

4. Recognize that pitch is the result of differences in the rate of vibration, and predict how a change in the rate of vibration will affect a sound. 

5. Demonstrate a variety of ways of producing sounds; e.g., by striking an empty glass, by blowing air into a bottle, by constructing and using a device that involves vibrating strings. 

6. Use sound-producing devices that the student has constructed to demonstrate methods for controlling the loudness, pitch and quality of sound produced. 

7. Identify examples that show that sound can travel through a variety of materials, including solids, liquids and air, and that sound travels in all directions. 

8. Describe how the human ear senses vibrations. 9. Compare the range of hearing in humans to that in other animals; e.g., dogs and bats. 

10. Recognize that certain sounds have characteristics that cause them to be interpreted as pleasant or unpleasant, and identify these characteristics. 

11. Describe changes in hearing that result from continued exposure to loud noise and from the natural process of aging. 

12. Construct and evaluate different kinds of soundproofing and sound-amplifying devices. 

  1. Explain the role that sound plays in communication.Sound and Hearing Supplementary Materials

Sound and Hearing Supplementary Materials

Bill Nye Sound Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kt1pTcfstC8 

How to become a D.J: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nthpwCMrhQw

The Doppler Effect Video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h4OnBYrbCjY

 

Materials and Designs/Building with a Variety of Materials

1. Recognize that functional structures must be sufficiently strong and stable and that unstable or weak structures are often unsafe to use.

2. Compare and evaluate the strength and stability of different models or objects constructed.

3. Describe the distinctive properties of some common solids, such as wood, paper or plastic, that make them suitable for use as building materials.

4. Apply procedures to test the strength of construction materials, in particular, different stocks of papers, plastics or wood.

5. Apply procedures to test different designs.

6. Apply procedures to test the strength of different methods of joining.

7. Identify and apply methods for making a structure stronger and more stable; e.g., by adding or joining parts to form triangles.

1. Using a variety of materials and techniques, design, construct and test structures that are intended to:

  • support objects
  • span gaps
  • serve as containers
  • serve as models of particular living things, objects or buildings.

2. Select appropriate materials for use in construction tasks, and explain the choice of materials. Students should demonstrate familiarity with a variety of materials, such as papers, woods, plastics, clay and metals.

3. Select tools that are suitable to particular tasks and materials, and use them safely and effectively.

4. Understand and use a variety of methods to join or fasten materials.

5. Identify the intended purpose and use of structures to be built, and explain how knowing the intended purpose and use helps guide decisions regarding materials and design.

6. Understand that simple designs are often as effective as more complex ones, as well as being easier and cheaper to build, and illustrate this understanding with a practical example.

7. Recognize the importance of good workmanship, and demonstrate growth toward good workmanship.

8. Maintain and store materials and tools safely and properly.

9. Apply skills of listening, speaking and cooperative decision making in working with other students on a construction project.

 

 

 

 

  • Testing Materials and Designs/Building with a Variety of Materials Supplementary Materials

 

Bill Nye Structures:

Bridges:

Domes:

Tallest building link    

Bill Nye “Architecture”  

Skyscrapers 

Eiffel Tower

Frames

Electricity

 

Math Expectations

 

 

All the Math work that students will do this year will relate to real life situations. Students will be taught about all the tools and strategies that they can choose from. They will always be given manipulatives to help them problem solve and be able to use the strategy that best works for them. Most often students will be given the choice to work alone or with a partner. The best way for students to get better at Math is to practice. Mathletics is a great and fun way for your child to do this!

 

NUMBER UNIT 

1. Say the number sequence 0 to 1000 forward and backward by: 

• 5s, 10s or 100s, using any starting point 

• 3s, using starting points that are multiples of 3 

• 4s, using starting points that are multiples of 4 

• 25s, using starting points that are multiples of 25. 

2. Represent and describe numbers to 1000, concretely, pictorially and symbolically. 

1.  Compare and order numbers to 1000. 

4. Estimate quantities less than 1000, using referents. 

5. Illustrate, concretely and pictorially, the meaning of place value for numerals to 1000. 

6. Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for adding two 2-digit numerals, such as: 

• adding from left to right 

• taking one addend to the nearest multiple of ten and then compensating 

• using doubles. 

7. Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for subtracting two 2-digit numerals, such as: 

• taking the subtrahend to the nearest multiple of ten and then compensating 

• thinking of addition 

• using doubles. 

8. Apply estimation strategies to predict sums and differences of two 2-digit numerals in a problem-solving context. 

9. Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of numbers with answers to 1000 (limited to 1-, 2- and 3-digit numerals), concretely, pictorially and symbolically, by: 

• using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives 

  • creating and solving problems in context that involve addition and subtraction of numbers. 
  • 10. Apply mental mathematics strategies and number properties, such as: 

• using doubles 

  • making 10 
  • using the commutative property 
  • using the property of zero 
  • thinking addition for subtraction 
  • in order to understand and recall basic addition facts and related subtraction facts to 18.  
  • Understand, recall and apply addition and related subtraction facts to 18. 

11. Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication to 5 × 5 by: 

• representing and explaining multiplication using equal grouping and arrays 

• creating and solving problems in context that involve multiplication 

• modelling multiplication using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically 

• relating multiplication to repeated addition 

• relating multiplication to division. 

Understand and recall multiplication facts to 5 × 5. 

12. Demonstrate an understanding of division (limited to division related to multiplication facts up to 5 × 5) by: 

• representing and explaining division using equal sharing and equal grouping 

• creating and solving problems in context that involve equal sharing and equal grouping 

• modelling equal sharing and equal grouping using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically 

• relating division to repeated subtraction 

  • relating division to multiplication. 

Understand and recall division facts related to multiplication facts to 5 × 5. 

13. Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by: 

• explaining that a fraction represents a part of a whole 

• describing situations in which fractions are used 

  • comparing fractions of the same whole that have like denominators. 

 

PATTERNS AND RELATIONS UNIT

1. Demonstrate an understanding of increasing patterns by: 

• describing 

• extending 

• comparing 

• creating 

numerical (numbers to 1000) and non-numerical patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. 

2. Demonstrate an understanding of decreasing patterns by: 

• describing 

• extending 

• comparing 

• creating 

numerical (numbers to 1000) and non-numerical patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. 

3. Sort objects or numbers, using one or more than one attribute. 

4. Solve one-step addition and subtraction equations involving a symbol to represent an unknown number. 

 

SHAPE AND SPACE UNIT (Measurement) 

1. Relate the passage of time to common activities, using nonstandard and standard units (minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years). 

2. Relate the number of seconds to a minute, the number of minutes to an hour and the number of days to a month in a problem-solving context.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of measuring length (cm, m) by: 

• selecting and justifying referents for the units cm and m 

• modeling and describing the relationship between the units cm and m 

• estimating length, using referents 

  • measuring and recording length, width and height. 

4. Demonstrate an understanding of measuring mass (g, kg) by: 

• selecting and justifying referents for the units g and kg 

• modelling and describing the relationship between the units g and kg 

  • estimating mass, using referents 
  • •measuring and recording mass. 
  • 5. Demonstrate an understanding of perimeter of regular and irregular shapes by: 
  • estimating perimeter, using referents for cm or m 

• measuring and recording perimeter (cm, m) 

• constructing different shapes for a given perimeter (cm, m) to demonstrate that many shapes are possible for a perimeter. 

 

SHAPE AND SPACE UNIT (3-D Objects and 2-D Shapes) 

  • General Outcome 
  • Describe the characteristics of 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, and analyze the relationships among them. 
  • Specific Outcomes 
  • 6. Describe 3-D objects according to the shape of the faces and the number of edges and vertices. 

7. Sort regular and irregular polygons, including: 

• triangles 

• quadrilaterals 

  • pentagons 

• hexagons 

• octagons 

  • according to the number of sides. 
  •  

STATISTICS AND PROBABILITY UNIT (Data Analysis) 

1. Collect first-hand data and organize it using: 

• tally marks 

• line plots 

• charts 

• lists 

to answer questions.  

  1. Construct, label and interpret bar graphs to solve problems. 
  2. Statistics and Probability Unit

1. Collect first-hand data and organize it using: 

  • tally marks 
  • line plots 
  • charts 
  • lists 
  • to answer questions.  
  1. Construct, label and interpret bar graphs to solve problems. 

 

Shape and Space Unit 3-D Objects and 2-D Shapes

 

1.General Outcome 

  • Describe the characteristics of 3-D objects and 2-D shapes, and analyze the relationships among them. 
  • Specific Outcomes 
  • 6. Describe 3-D objects according to the shape of the faces and the number of edges and vertices. 

7. Sort regular and irregular polygons, including: 

  •  triangles 
  • quadrilaterals 
  • pentagons 
  • hexagons 
  • octagons 
  • according to the number of sides. 

Sorting Attributes video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QPHfQ2scgzA

 

Shape and Space Unit

1. Relate the passage of time to common activities, using nonstandard and standard units (minutes, hours, days, weeks, months, years). 

2. Relate the number of seconds to a minute, the number of minutes to an hour and the number of days to a month in a problem-solving context.

3. Demonstrate an understanding of measuring length (cm, m) by: 

  • selecting and justifying referents for the units cm and m 
  • modeling and describing the relationship between the units cm and m 
  • estimating length, using referents 
  • measuring and recording length, width and height. 

4. Demonstrate an understanding of measuring mass (g, kg) by: 

  • selecting and justifying referents for the units g and kg 
  • modelling and describing the relationship between the units g and kg 
  • estimating mass, using referents 
  • measuring and recording mass. 

5. Demonstrate an understanding of perimeter of regular and irregular shapes by: 

  • estimating perimeter, using referents for cm or m 
  • measuring and recording perimeter (cm, m) 
  • constructing different shapes for a given perimeter (cm, m) to demonstrate that many shapes are possible for a perimeter. 

 

Patterns and Relations Unit

1. Demonstrate an understanding of increasing patterns by: 

  • describing 
  • extending 
  • comparing 
  • creating 
  • numerical (numbers to 1000) and non-numerical patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. 

2. Demonstrate an understanding of decreasing patterns by: 

  • describing 
  • extending 
  • comparing 
  • creating 
  • numerical (numbers to 1000) and non-numerical patterns using manipulatives, diagrams, sounds and actions. 

3. Sort objects or numbers, using one or more than one attribute. 

  1. Solve one-step addition and subtraction equations involving a symbol to represent an unknown number. 

 

Number Unit

1. Say the number sequence 0 to 1000 forward and backward by: 

  • 5s, 10s or 100s, using any starting point 
  • 3s, using starting points that are multiples of 3 
  • 4s, using starting points that are multiples of 4 
  • 25s, using starting points that are multiples of 25. 

2. Represent and describe numbers to 1000, concretely, pictorially and symbolically. 

  • Compare and order numbers to 1000. 

3. Estimate quantities less than 1000, using referents. 

4. Illustrate, concretely and pictorially, the meaning of place value for numerals to 1000. 

5. Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for adding two 2-digit numerals, such as: 

  • adding from left to right 
  • taking one addend to the nearest multiple of ten and then compensating 
  • using doubles. 

6. Describe and apply mental mathematics strategies for subtracting two 2-digit numerals, such as: 

  • taking the subtrahend to the nearest multiple of ten and then compensating 
  • thinking of addition 
  • using doubles. 

7. Apply estimation strategies to predict sums and differences of two 2-digit numerals in a problem-solving context. 

8. Demonstrate an understanding of addition and subtraction of numbers with answers to 1000 (limited to 1-, 2- and 3-digit numerals), concretely, pictorially and symbolically, by: 

  • using personal strategies for adding and subtracting with and without the support of manipulatives 
  • creating and solving problems in context that involve addition and subtraction of numbers. 

9. Apply mental mathematics strategies and number properties, such as: 

  • using doubles 
  • making 10 
  • using the commutative property 
  • using the property of zero 
  • thinking addition for subtraction 
  • in order to understand and recall basic addition facts and related subtraction facts to 18.  
  • Understand, recall and apply addition and related subtraction facts to 18. 

10. Demonstrate an understanding of multiplication to 5 × 5 by: 

  • representing and explaining multiplication using equal grouping and arrays 
  • creating and solving problems in context that involve multiplication 
  • modelling multiplication using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically 
  • relating multiplication to repeated addition 
  • relating multiplication to division. 
  • Understand and recall multiplication facts to 5 × 5. 

11. Demonstrate an understanding of division (limited to division related to multiplication facts up to 5 × 5) by: 

  • representing and explaining division using equal sharing and equal grouping 
  • creating and solving problems in context that involve equal sharing and equal grouping 
  • modelling equal sharing and equal grouping using concrete and visual representations, and recording the process symbolically 
  • relating division to repeated subtraction 
  • relating division to multiplication. 
  • Understand and recall division facts related to multiplication facts to 5 × 5. 

12. Demonstrate an understanding of fractions by: 

  • explaining that a fraction represents a part of a whole 
  • describing situations in which fractions are used 
  • comparing fractions of the same whole that have like denominators. 

 

Indian Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4V--sgKmv3s

 

Peruvian Video

http://youtu.be/nrdkqhTgg88

FUN one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4V--sgKmv3s

 

Tunisian Video

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyBlOfPdZcc

 

Ukranian Dance

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioOKZlK3UOg